NoMad NYC is bound by 30th and 25th Streets to the north and south and Lexington and 6th Avenues from the east to the west, respectively. The neighborhood is conveniently located in central Manhattan and is a highly sought-after place to live, with its name derived from its location north of Madison Square Park. 


History

MadisonSquarePark-History

PC: Madison Square Park Conservancy

As its name would suggest, NoMad’s history is closely tied to that of Madison Square Park. Originally constructed in 1686, the park served several functions over the years, including stints as an army arsenal juvenile delinquency facility.

Around the mid-19th century, residents began building homes around the park. It quickly became a hub for the wealthy and elite, housing many prominent places of worship, club headquarters, and high-end restaurants.  

In the late-19th century, the area became more commercially focused, with a subsequent, brief stint as an entertainment-and-vice hub within Manhattan.

As time went on, it began returning to its original roots, and now the area is known as a high-end residential location for the professionals of midtown and downtown. 


Accessibility

23rd Street

PC: Connected Nomad

NoMad is very accessible with the R and W trains traveling along the Broadway line and the 6 train traveling along the IRT line at their respective 23rd and 28th Street stations. There are also several buses that service the area and numerous Citibike stations. 


Lifestyle

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PC: Time Out

The pace in NoMad is rigorous. As cliche as the “work hard, play hard” adage is, this place definitely embodies that.

The area offers a wide array of activities and places to check out after a long week. See a show at the New York Comedy Club, visit one of the area’s many antique galleries, or check out the one and only Museum of Sex. The neighborhood is also home to one of the city’s largest collections of weekend flea markets.


Restaurants

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PC: Business Insider

Notable restaurants in the area include Hill Country Barbecue, A Voce, Ilili, and Eataly (a 44,000 square foot Italian food market). Several popular bars in the neighborhood include Jay-Z’s 40/40 Club, and the rooftop bar at 230 5th Avenue.


Cost

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PC: Hotel Giraffe

Alongside its westward neighbor TriBeCa, NoMad is one of the most expensive neighborhoods in Manhattan when it comes to property values. The median rent for a 2-bedroom apartment will run you $6,974/month, and the median sales prices for condos in the area are $1,722,500 for a 1-bedroom apartment and $3,155,000 for a 2-bedroom apartment. 


Final Verdict

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PC: Prodigy Network

When Alicia Keys sang, “these streets will make you feel brand new, big lights will inspire you,” we get the feeling she was talking about places like NoMad. The flow and pace can seem overwhelming, but it forces you to keep up or fall behind.

In that sense, the area is uplifting and motivating. Properties are expensive, but worth it if you want to be surrounded by history, seemingly unlimited amenities, and ambitious neighbors.


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